GANA | Anesthesia Care

Who is Really Providing Your Anesthesia?

CRNAs continue to be the nation’s leader in the administration of anesthesia services. In fact, there are more than 59,000 nurse anesthetists in the United States (including CRNAs and student registered nurse anesthetists). CRNAs are Advanced Practice Registered Nurses who have completed rigorous academic and clinical training in order to provide their patients with safe, high quality, and affordable anesthesia care. CRNAs continue to provide over 50 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States and continue to be the primary anesthesia provider to rural Georgians and Americans.

CRNAs practice in every setting where anesthesia is delivered including hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, physician offices, obstetrical delivery rooms, in the Department of Veterans Affairs facilities, and in the United States military. When anesthesia is administered by a nurse anesthetist, it is recognized as the practice of nursing; when administered by a physician anesthesiologist, it is recognized as the practice of medicine. Regardless of whether their educational background is in nursing or medicine, all anesthesia professionals administer anesthesia the same away.

GANA CRNA Anesthesia

THE GANA PROUDLY SUPPORTS
GEORGIA’S NURSE ANESTHESIA PROGRAMS


Augusta University

Emery University

GEORGIA’S NURSE ANESTHESIA PROGRAMS

The education and experience required to become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) include:

  • A baccalaureate or graduate degree in nursing or an appropriate major.
  • An unencumbered license as a registered professional nurse and/or APRN in the United States or its territories.
  • Graduation with a minimum of a master’s degree from a nurse anesthesia educational program accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA). As of August 2022, there were 128 accredited nurse anesthesia programs in the United States using more than 2,100 active clinical sites; 46 nurse anesthesia programs are approved to award doctoral degrees for entry into practice. Nurse anesthesia programs are 42 months, depending on university requirements. Programs include clinical settings and experiences.
  • Pass the National Certification Examination following graduation.

It takes a minimum of seven calendar years of education and experience to prepare a CRNA. More than 2,400 student registered nurse anesthetists graduate each year and go on to pass the National Certification Examination to become CRNAs.

How to Become a CRNA

To become a CRNA you must first become a Registered Nurse with a bachelors or master’s degree. After achieving your degree, you must work a minimum of one year of full-time nursing experience in a critical care setting. The average experience for students entering a CRNA program is 2.9 years of ICU experience.

Though there are a few master’s degree programs left, all CRNA students must graduate with a doctorate level degree starting in 2025 to be eligible to sit for their board exam. Following graduation from an accredited nurse anesthesia program you will be eligible to take the National Certification Exam (NCE) and become a CRNA. This is a long journey but well worth it.

If you are unsure if becoming a CRNA is right for you, please contact us and consider clicking the “Shadow a CRNA” link so that we can get you paired with a practicing CRNA to show you first-hand what CRNAs do.

CRNA

Shadow a CRNA

Registered Nurses currently working in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) may submit their interest to shadow a CRNA by completing the form below.

GANA CRNA

History

As early as 1916, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) were providing anesthesia at Grady Hospital in Atlanta. In 1938, seventeen CRNAs established the Georgia Association of Nurse Anesthetists (GANA). Spearheading the formation of the GANA was Rosalie C. McDonald, who became its first president. Ms. McDonald later served as the sixth president of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA), our national organization. More than 90% of U.S. nurse anesthetists are members of the AANA.

Today, the GANA has grown to represent over 1300 members and is among the oldest and largest CRNA state organization in the United States. CRNAs are committed to caring for Georgia by providing vigilant, high-quality, and cost effective anesthesia services. Nurse anesthesia is safe anesthesia.

CRNAs in Georgia practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered: traditional hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms; critical access hospitals; ambulatory surgical centers; the offices of dentists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists, plastic surgeons, and pain management specialists; and U.S. military, Public Health Services, and Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare facilities.

Past Presidents

2000-Present

  • Wesley Karcher (2020-2021)
  • Eddie Thomas (2019-2020)
  • Wallace Phillips (2018-2019)
  • Barry Cranfill (2017)
  • Jo Sineath (2015 – 2016)
  • Leslie Ann Jeter (2014)
  • Mark Schmitz (2013)
  • James Masiongale (2012)
  • Brent Dubois (2011)
  • Rose Synsmir (2010)
  • Barry Cranfill (2009)
  • Stephen D. Smith (2008)
  • Cheryl E. McRae-Bergeron (2007)
  • Matthew Kervin (2006)
  • Barbara Waldron (2005)
  • Leslie Ann Jeter (2004)
  • Martha Kral (2003)
  • Leslie Ann Jeter (2002)
  • Mary P. Flister (2001)
  • James Hanke (2000)

1937-1999

  • Janice Izlar (1999)
  • Kay Argroves (1998)
  • Glen Horne (1997)
  • Mark Schmitz (1996)
  • George Maule (1995)
  • Cecelia Morales (1994)
  • Glen Horne (1993)
  • Elizabeth Ann Thompson (1992)
  • Brad Littleton (1991)
  • Elizabeth Ann Thompson (1990)
  • Kenneth Phillips (1989)
  • Cynthia Robertson (1988)
  • Jacquelyn W. Chandler (1987)
  • Jane Rehak (1986)
  • Stella Williamson (1985)
  • Sharon Twibell (1984)
  • Michael D. Harper (1983)
  • Joyce Middlebrooks (1982)
  • Dorothy Snead (1981)
  • Velma Rice (1979-1980)
  • Freda Munguia (1978)
  • Sister Carmelita Alvero (1977)
  • Iris Berry (1975-1976)
  • Barbara Reep, AANA/Iris Berry (1974)
  • Barbara Reep (1973)
  • Yolanda Olivero (1971 – 1972)
  • Twila Stiffler (1970)
  • Peggy Hart (1969)
  • Annie L. Nutt (1968)
  • Mary Lou Carpenter (1966 – 1967)
  • L. Johnnie McDaniel (1964 – 1965)
  • Virginia W. Wade (1963)
  • R. Arline Bragg (1962)
  • Sari C. Bennet (1961)
  • Virginia A. Edwards (1959-1960)
  • Christine Fields (1958)
  • Nell Livengood (1957)
  • Barbara Reep (1956)
  • Nannell Smith (1955)
  • Eula Evans Miller (1954)
  • Winnie Paxton (1953)
  • Hilda Singletary (1952)
  • Virginia Underwood (1951)
  • Regina Noon (1950)
  • Mattie Lawrence (1949)
  • Ruby Ridley (1948)
  • Grace Rapp (1947)
  • Clara Mahoney (1946)
  • Billie Caraway (1944-1945)
  • Jean Greear McGinty (1941-1943)
  • Halo Warman (1940)
  • Rosalie McDonald (1937-1939)

Rosalie McDonald Award Winners
  • Wallace Phillips (2021)
  • Janice Stahl (2020)
  • None (2019)
  • Jim Masiongale (2018)
  • Kathy Mann (2017)
  • Rose Synsmir (2016)
  • Kay Argroves (2015)
  • Barry Cranfill (2014)
  • Barbara Waldron (2013)
  • Stephen D. Smith (2012)
  • Mark Schmitz (2011)
  • Martha Kral (2010)
  • Mary Flister (2009)
  • Sharon Twibell (2008)
  • Leslie Jeter (2007)
  • Janice Izlar (2006)
  • Roger Masters (2005)
  • Teresa Hennings (2004)
  • Ken Phillips (2003)
  • Ann Thompson (2002)
  • Yolanda Olivera (2001)
  • Sister John Moravec (2000)
  • Cecilia Morales (1999)
  • Nora Goodman (1998)
  • Jackie Chandler (1997)
  • Doris Slaughter (1996)
  • Lillian Hawkins (1995)
  • Brad Littleton (1994)
  • Barbara Reep (1993)
  • Freda Mungia-Bittle (1992)
  • Velma Rice (1991)
  • Dorothy Snead (1990)
  • Eula Adams (1989)
  • Nell Livingood (1988)

Outstanding Student Nurse Anesthetist of the Year Award
  • Matthew Oxford (2021)
  • Jordan Barnes (2020)
  • Sarah Green (2019)
  • Jessica Galloway (2018)
  • Xavier Tolliver (2017)
  • April Culler (2016)
  • Courtney Voss and Kassandra Krieger (2015)
  • Joseph “Tripp” Penick (2014)
  • Malorie Brewer (2013)
  • Jennifer Simonetti (2012)
  • Whitney Huffman (2011)
  • Katie Truitt (2010)
  • Taushera Westbrook (2009)
  • Ginger Flowers Hamilton (2008)
  • Jeff Cryder (2007)
  • Jeffrey Hornung (2006)
  • Captain Neil S. Hurd (2005)
  • DeAnna H. Powell (2004)
  • Lyle C. Dorman and Lee W. Dorman (2003)
  • Judy L. Graham-Garcia (2002)
  • Ellen L. Landrum (2001)
  • Mark E. Henning (2000)
  • Matthew W. Kervin (1999)
  • Holly E. Holman (1998)
  • Geraldine A. Secor (1997)